The invincible JP Morgan

Felix Salmon of Reuters:

When JP Morgan paid its record $13 billion fine for problems with its mortgage securitizations, the bank came out of the experience surprisingly unscathed, in large part because Wall Street reckoned that the real guilt lay mainly in the actions of companies that JP Morgan had bought (Bear Stearns and WaMu) rather than in any actions undertaken on its own watch. There was a feeling that the bank was being unfairly singled out for punishment — a feeling which, at least in part, was justified.

The latest $2 billion fine, however, which also comes with a deferred prosecution agreement, is entirely on JP Morgan’s shoulders — and still, as Peter Eavis reports, it’s being “taken in stride” by the giant bank. It really seems that CNBC is right, and that profits really do cleanse all sins. How is it that a $450 million fine sufficed to defenestrate the CEO of Barclays, but that Jamie Dimon, overseeing some $20 billion of fines plus a deferred prosecution agreement just in the space of one year, seems to be made of teflon?

As Salmon concludes:

In the face of a determined regulatory onslaught over the past 18 months, from mortgage-related prosecutions to the Volcker Rule, JP Morgan’s share price has gone steadily up and to the right, almost doubling over that period. In the view of Wall Street, that share price is Dimon’s vindication, and his ultimate shield. The lesson of yesterday’s news cycle is that no one can pierce it. Not even the Justice Department.

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