Tagged: Video

The Train

This is the end of The Train by John Frankenheimer – moral ambiguity etc.  One you should watch, another early 60s black and white film much overlooked.

Wikipedia:

The Train is a 1964 black-and-white war film directed by John Frankenheimer from a story and screenplay by Franklin Coen and Frank Davis, based on the non-fiction book Le front de l’art by Rose Valland, who documented the works of art placed in storage that had been looted by the Germans from museums and private art collections. It stars Burt Lancaster, Paul Scofield, and Jeanne Moreau.

Set in August 1944, the film sets French Resistance-member Paul Labiche (Lancaster) against German Colonel Franz von Waldheim (Scofield), who is attempting to move stolen art masterpieces by train to Germany. Inspiration for the scenes of the train’s interception came from the real-life events surrounding train No. 40,044 as it was seized and examined by Lt. Alexandre Rosenberg of the Free French forces outside Paris.

The Bedford Incident

One to see.

Wikipedia:

The Bedford Incident is a 1965 AngloAmerican Cold War film starring Richard Widmark and Sidney Poitier, and co-produced by Richard Widmark. The cast also features Eric Portman, James MacArthur, Martin Balsam and Wally Cox, as well as early appearances by Donald Sutherland and Ed Bishop. The screenplay by James Poe is based on the 1963 book by Mark Rascovich. This in turn was patterned after Herman Melville‘s Moby-Dick; at one point in the film the captain is advised he is “no longer hunting whales”.

True Detective

Re-watching the whole series and this is a 6 min tracking shot that is worth looking at.  Don’t know how it compares to the Wire but very Robert Altman (also Orson Welles touch of evil).

Bill Moyers interviews Richard Wolff

Richard Wolff’s smart, blunt talk about the crisis of capitalism on his first Moyers & Company appearance was so compelling and provocative, we asked him to return. This time, the economics expert dives further into income inequality, analyzing the widening gap between a booming stock market and a population that increasingly lives in poverty. Wolff also takes questions sent in from around the world by our viewers.